How Ready Am I? A Self-Assessment for Global Work, Part I

When I was 23, an editor position opened up at the publishing house where I was working. In the vein of having integrity, I approached my boss with my interest in the position.

“You don’t have the chops for that job,” he told me point-blank.

His blithe directness, to be frank, chapped my hide. But looking back now, there’s no doubt in my mind he was right. I’m not sure if I have the chops for that particular job now. Yet it did make me take a look at the job itself and gradually appreciate just how off my self-assessment was–as well as my understanding of the job itself. And honestly, I buckled down to eventually be the kind of person who could qualify for a job like that.

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Free Printable Infographic: 10 Ways to Pray for Unreached People Groups

MOTIVATED?

How could you make unreached people groups a regular prayer focus? A couple of ideas:

  1. Choose one day a month to pray, and even fast, for these groups. (You could choose the 10th day, ’cause we’ve got 10 ideas.)
  2. Choose one prayer request a day, starting again every 10 days.
  3. Choose one day a week to pray for UPG’s.
  4. Distribute this as a bulletin insert in your church, or make them easily available on a website or in a kiosk.
  5. Invite your small group to pray with you.
  6. Have a rice and beans fast on the 10th of the month, praying for these groups.
  7. Hang this list inside a cupboard or medicine cabinet, and pray for one request whenever you open it.

unreached people groups

PRINT IT HERE!

 

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DON’T MISS this list from our partner Global Frontier Missions of incredible (many printable) resources to pray for the unreached as a regular focus of your own prayer efforts.

And find more ideas to to pray for UPGs here.

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The Generation Who Can: Reaching the Unreached with News They Can’t Live Without

More printable infographics on our Tools for Your Trip page

Throwback Thursdays: Relentless Truth from Those Who’ve Gone Before, #3

St. Francis of Assisi (1182-1226) was born into a wealthy, worldly Italian family under the original name of Giovanni Francesco di Pietro di Berardone. (Try saying that five times fast.) But upon his conversion, his life altered dramatically. He actually took the swanky clothes from his back and handed them to his father, longing to “imitate Christ” in a lifestyle of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

In the midst of his “great agony of doubt”, Francis sent a friend to ask others in the faith to pray for him. They separately replied the following:

“The Lord says you are to tell Brother Francis this: that God has not called him to this state only on his own account, but that he may reap a harvest of souls and that many may be saved through him.”

“He wants you to go about the world preaching, because God did not call you for yourself alone but also for the salvation of others.”*

God did not call you for yourself alone but also for the salvation of others. -St. Francis of Assisi Click To Tweet

This thought of going overseas can be nothing short of intimidating. But is there a chance God’s dreams are even bigger than yours?

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*As reported by Foster, Richard J. and James Bryan Smith, eds. Devotional Classics: Selected Readings for Individuals and Groups. New York: HarperOne (2005), pp. 295-296. Quotations from The Little Flowers of St. Francis.

 

Freebie Friday: 7 Standards of Excellence in Your Global Work [INFOGRAPHIC]

Here at GSL, we’re all about bringing you tools you can use to truly go there, serve Him, and love them well. So we’ve partnered with Standards of Excellence in Short-Term Mission to bring you today’s (totally printable) infographic: 7 Standards of Excellence.

Why do standards like these matter?

We acknowledge you may feel frustrated by patronizing “help” that actually hurts, or by work that makes us feel better but makes them feel worse, or by global work that continues cycles of poverty, or by missions trips that cannibalize employment.

That’s why. 

Because loving well matters. Serving our King with excellent work matters. Christianity doesn’t destroy culture. Christianity makes culture come alive— and development, too.

Wondering if your efforts–or the organization you’re thinking of going with– are on the right track to sustainable, effective outcomes? Check out these 7 critical standards. And print them here!

7 standards of excellence in global work

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